6 Tips To Writing Effective Emails

The average business person receives around 80 emails a day. Although we write a lot of emails everyday, most people do not know how to write effective emails. Writing emails is an essential skill that entrepreneurs must master. As such, we will look at 6 principles for sending emails that get results.

Always include a subject

The subject line is probably the most important part of an email, but it is often ignored by the sender. A blank subject line is more likely to be ignored or rejected as spam. You should always identify the purpose of your email in the subject. A clear and concise subject gives the recepient of the email a sense of what the email is about.

Use the KISS method

Keep It Simple, Stupid.
Make your emails as short as possible and always go straight to the point. Your email body should be direct and unambiguous and should contain pertinent information. Use numbered paragraphs and bullet points to make it easier to digest

Cc: and Bcc:

When using Cc: to send an email to several recipients, try to keep the list to a minimum.
Use BCC instead of CC if it isn't important for email recipients to see who else the email was sent to. In this case, you can put your own email address in the "To" field.

Be professional

Don't ramble and always check your tone. Avoid slang, shorthand, inappropriate abbreviations/acronyms and fonts, emoticons and typing in ALL CAPS. 


 You do not want to send a business email filled with typos and spelling errors. Always spell check before sending an email. Use proper grammar, spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Try reading your message out loud to help you catch mistakes you might otherwise miss


Sign off with "Sincerely", "Respectfully" or the like and attach a signature of your full name, job title and contact information. You don't need to include fancy artwork. 

What other tips to you have for writing business emails? Tell us

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